London Natural History Society The place for wildlife in London

London Natural History Society - The place for wildlife in London

The Hemiptera is a large and diverse insect order in Britain, containing nearly 2000 species, many of which can be found in London. In fact, some are found nowhere else! Species from continental Europe or even further afield are now regularly becoming established in Britain and the London area is often where they first appear. Now is an exciting time to record these insects within the capital.

Hemipteria Palomena prasinaCommon Green Shieldbug

Palomena prasina

A uniformly green species, although turning brown before hibernation. The membrane at the tip of the wings is dark. Very common in many habitats including parks and gardens, feeding on a wide range of plants.

Hemipteria1 Nezara viridulaSouthern Green Shieldbug

Nezara viridula

Similar to the above species and best distinguished by the transparent pale wing membrane. Uncommon and usually in man-made habitats. Most frequent in allotments, where it is particularly fond of runner beans. A recent arrival in Britain and largely confined to the London area. Records are of particular interest.

Hemipteria1 Rhaphigaster nebulosaMottled Shieldbug

Rhaphigaster nebulosa

This species is distinguished by the wing membrane, which is covered in dark spots. The antennae are also strongly banded. Uncommon and usually in man-made habitats. A recent arrival in Britain and so far entirely confined to the London area. Records are of particular interest.

Hemipteria1 Leptoglossus occidentalisWestern Conifer Seedbug

Leptoglossus occidentalis

A very large and striking bug, with characteristic leaf-like expansions on the hind legs. Native to the USA; a recent arrival in Britain and now widespread, although rarely seen in the summer months, when it lives on pines. Most records are of bugs overwintering inside buildings.

Hemipteria1 Corizus hyoscyami 

 

Corizus hyoscyami

A striking red and black bug which is also rather hairy. A recent arrival in the London area and historically confined to the southern and western coasts of Britain. Now found in a range of habitats including gardens.

Hemipteria1 Miris striatus 

Miris striatus

A large and distinctive black and yellow plant bug, most often seen in mid-summer. Widespread in parks and gardens on deciduous trees, particularly oaks and hawthorns.

Hemipteria1 Cercopis vulnerataRed and Black Froghopper

Cercopis vulnerata

An unmistakable species which is most often found in May and June. Widespread and common across much of England and Wales on a range of herbaceous plants, but rather uncommon in the LNHS recording area and largely absent from urban London.

Hemipteria1 Centrotus cornutusHorned Treehopper

Centrotus cornutus

An unmistakable species which is most often found in May and June. Widespread and common across much of England and Wales and generally associated with old woodlands. Rather uncommon in the LNHS recording area and largely absent from urban London.

Hemipteria1 Ledra auritaEared Leafhopper

Ledra aurita

The largest leafhopper in Europe, with characteristic ear-like projections on the thorax. A cryptic bark dweller, particularly on lichen-covered oaks. Rarely seen, although may come to moth traps.

Hemipteria1 Graphocephala fennahiRhododendron Leafhopper

Graphocephala fennahi

A very distinctive red and green leafhopper which feeds on Rhododendron and is frequent in London’s parks. Originally native to the USA, it was introduced to Britain in the early 1900s and has since spread widely.