London Natural History Society The place for wildlife in London

London Natural History Society - The place for wildlife in London

About LNHS

London's biodiversity faces new challenges from climate change and development pressure. You can contribute to the conservation of wildlife in the London area by helping to record the changing fortunes of the many species that live here. Together with our historic records, this information will help us to tackle the conservation issues of the future.

Waterloo 07

 The London Natural History Society comprises of a number active sections focussing on specific taxonomic groups or wildlife sites.

LNHS logoThe London Natural History Society (or LNHS as it is commonly known) is a local natural history society within the UK concerned with recording the wildlife of London, covering a circular area covering a 20-mile radius from St. Paul's Cathedral. The society aims include to foster the appreciation and study of London's wildlife and natural environment and assisting in the conservation of wildlife in the London area by helping to record London's wildlife. Society activities include running both indoor and outdoor events throughout the year and producing a number of publications, including the annual London Naturalist and London Bird Report. The LNHS library is housed at the Natural History Museum, London.

Society aims

Grey Heron SQUARE

  • to foster the appreciation and study of London's wildlife and natural environment. We strive to achieve this aim by engaging and informing both members and public alike with a variety of activities and resources.
  • to assist in the conservation of wildlife in the London area by helping to record the changing fortunes of the many species that live here. Together with our historic records, this information will help us to tackle the conservation issues of the future.
  • to help our members with their own efforts and projects. 
  • to offer our members enjoyable and rewarding experiences as they learn about London's fascinating, rich and diverse natural heritage.

LNHS sections

Marsh Marigold SQUARE
The LNHS is organised into five sections each with a specific remit relating to recording London's diverse biodiversity:

Brimstone SQUAREYou will see these sections represented in the programme each with their own colour. Members are thus able to concentrated on a particular section that best reflects their interest. Members can also pick and choose events that are close to their locality from any section.

Each section is run by a dedicated committee which reports to the LNHS overall committee. In this way the LNHS provides members with access to specialists covering a broad range of wildlife and biodiversity interests.

At the same time as enjoying the familiar, members appreciate and learn about the unfamiliar. There is always something new and exciting to discover after joining the LNHS. 

A brief history

Biodiversity Heritage Library holdingsThe LNHS traces its roots back to 1858 when the Haggerstone Entomological Society was founded in June of that year. By the end of the year, it had 35 members, who met one evening per week in the Carpenters' Arms, a pub in Haggerston. By 1887 the society had changed its name to The City of London Entomological and Natural History Society and had moved to a more central meeting point at Albion Hall.

In 1886 four boys at the Grocers' Company School in Hackney founded the Clapton Naturalists' Field Club, which met in members' houses. This society grew rapidly, and in 1892 changed its name to the North London Natural History Society. It covered all branches of natural history, a term which at that time was understood to include all the natural sciences including astronomy, meteorology and geology. In 1893 the Society admitted ladies for the first time. Local groups were formed in some parts of London, and the programme of activities included field trips, regular indoor meetings, exhibitions, and even music recitals and fund-raising dances.

In 1913 the City of London Entomological and Natural History Society and the North London Natural History Society merged and the London Natural History Society was formed, its study area being set as a 20-mile circle around St Paul's Cathedral (as it still stands today).

 

Social media


FB24 LNHS Facebook page

The Facebook Page is open. Anyone can join.

FB24 LNHS Facebook group
The Facebook Group is a closed group for members and others associated with the LNHS.

TwitterLogo24 LNHS Twitter feed
Search using #lnhsoc.

TwitterLogo24 London Bird Club Twitter feed
Search using #londonbirds.

YahooLogo Yahoo message board
Members only, see main panel for instructions.

WikiaLogo London Bird Club wiki
Open to the public.

FlickrLogo Ecology & Entomology Flickr
Open to the public.